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Baobab – How to Make Baobab Powder At Home

Baobab, the super fruit from the tree of life (or upside down tree) that has reigned as a life giver possessing life giving and medicinal qualities with some that are 2500 years old.  Unfortunately, in large parts of Africa the baobab tree is struggling with worrying rates of decline linked to climate change.  This decline is even more significant as these trees as notoriously resilient.  After Maria, these stood tall and untouched.  These trees are impressive to behold, some as large as houses and with so many wonderful qualities embedded in most every part of the tree, this precious tree needs to be preserved.  I am grateful that beyond the African savannah, they were introduced to my home here on my island of St. Croix.

According to researchers, they are the largest flowering tree with the greatest longevity (3,0000 years!)  They call it the “upside down tree” due to its root-like branches and they call it the tree of life as its cultural significance has been cemented it its ability to store water in their massive trunks that in turn, can quench the thirst of both human and animal, especially during the dry season along with the fact that its leaves can be eaten as a green vegetable, its bark can be used for household goods like cloth, rope, baskets, etc and both its fruit and other components can be applied as medicine.

Being rich in vitamin C and antioxidants, it has quickly become a buzz word surrounding beauty and health care products in the states.  Today, I’m breaking down some fresh baobab to harvest the pulp and collect the powder.  I most often use it in smoothie bowls or chia puddings but I also like to use it in a tropical mask by simply combining freshly foraged papaya for its enzymes, raw local honey for its antimicrobial qualities, homemade coconut yogurt for moisture, probiotics and its ability to bind the mask and lastly, the star ingredient of fresh baobab powder.

Here’s the finished product that I store in a bpa-free glass in the fridge and here’s how I did it:

 

Fresh fruit will generally dry on the tree.  I bring it in and typically allow it to crack open on its own.

 

The interior will reveal a brain like structure with a webbing of fruit fiber.  You simply disentangle the white fruit pulp from it and set them into a colander.  You can set the velvet shell aside for decorative purposes.

I simply sift the powder into a clean bowl.  You can rub the seeds together to help it along.

The seeds are also edible and can be roasted.  The pulp itself tastes like apricots to me and have been described as having a lightly tart and sweet flavor.  Their natural creaminess can be harnessed into a mylk.  If you can’t obtain fresh baobab where you are, this is also a great alternative.

What results is a food that contains 3 times more vitamin c than oranges that is rich in potassium, fiber and alkalizing power with twice the antioxidants of goji berries, blueberries and pomegranates….combined!

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